Questions & Answers about Regina Vinegar

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Does Regina offer any other products other than wine vinegars?
Are Regina vinegars and cooking wines interchangeable?
How are Regina Wine Vinegars made?
Do Regina Red and White Wine Vinegars contain alcohol?
What is the meaning of grain strength in vinegar?


Q. Does Regina offer any other products other than wine vinegars?
A. Yes, Regina offers red and white wine vinegars, balsamic vinegars and cooking wines.


Q. Are Regina vinegars and cooking wines interchangeable?
A. No, vinegars and cooking wines cannot be used to replace one for the other.


Q. How are Regina Wine Vinegars made?
A. Wine vinegar is the result of two separate fermentations. First, the grapes are crushed by a large cylinder-shaped device, removing stems and breaking the skins releasing the rich juice. Then, the crushed grape pulp and juice (called must) are pumped into large fermenting vats. Here, the grape sugar is transformed by grape yeasts into carbon dioxide gas and wine alcohol. The gas then escapes by bubbling continuously, and soon all juice has been fermented into wine.

In the second fermentation, acetic bacteria is added to the wine. The acetic bacteria causes a new chemical change, drawing oxygen from the air and uniting it with the alcohol of the wine. Finally, all alcohol has been converted to acetic acid, the substance that gives vinegar its pleasant sharpness. The resulting vinegar is filtered and diluted with water to specified grain strength.


Q. Do Regina Red and White Wine Vinegars contain alcohol?
A. No, in the fermentation process all alcohol has been converted/removed. (The U.S. Food and Drug Administration requires products that do contain alcohol to indicate the percent by volume on the front label. We have no such indication because Regina vinegars do not contain alcohol.)


Q. What is the meaning of grain strength in vinegar?
A. The grain strength indicates the acetic acid content. Grain strength is ten times the acetic acid content, so 50 grain vinegar is 5% acetic acid, 100 grain is 10% acetic acid and 200 grain is 20% acetic acid.